We Asked, You Said, We Did

Below are some of the issues we have recently consulted on and their outcomes.

We asked

Feeback on Southport Eastern Access Improvements Scheme – We Asked, You Said, We Did.

A public consultation was held on the Southport Eastern Access Improvement scheme in two stages. Both stages used the same information, with key stakeholders being offered a meeting or in person visits to discuss elements of the plans in more detail.

Stage 1 Focused on key stakeholders identified by the Council, and those who have an interest in the land on which the scheme will be delivered, either through a freehold, leasehold, or statutory undertaking.

Stage 2 – Wider public engagement. This ran from 3rd November to 23rd December 2023.

The Southport Eastern Access improvement scheme area is on the eastern approach to Southport Town Centre and is recognised as having a mixture of light industrial, retail, and residential uses. The area can experience traffic congestion particularly at peak hours and on days when significant numbers of visitors travel to the town. It also   and has limited walking and cycling (active travel) links. This can cause traffic delays and air pollution, as well as limiting the accessibility of employment and leisure opportunities for those choosing more sustainable modes of travel. The aim of the scheme is to therefore to tackle these issues and create safe walking and cycling routes whilst also improving traffic conditions. This will enhance safety, the overall public realm and attractiveness of the routes/area.

We asked for comments of the proposed changes for the eight junctions and walking and cycling improvements.

Since the public consultation, the Council have agreed on the phasing of how the scheme will be delivered. The phases are below:

Phase 1 – To be delivered in 2025.

  • Bispham Road Junction
  • Sussex Road Junction
  • Foul Lane Cycleway Enhancement (corridor improvement).

Phase 2 – To be delivered in 2026.

  • Kew Roundabout

Phase 3 – To be delivered in 2027 (subject to funding).

  • Castlemore Junction
  • Meols Cop Active Travel
  • Hampton Road Tiger Crossing
  • Virginia Street Roundabout
  • Bridge Street Junction

You said

FINDINGS OF THE CONSULTATION

Within the Your Sefton Your Say survey the public had an opportunity to comment on all individual elements of the scheme. The main findings and answers to some key queries and concerns can be found below:

There were 17 responses from stage 1 and 241 from stage 2 to the online surveys. All have been reviewed and analysed alongside the 16 emails responses that came directly via the Transport Planning inbox, which have been responded to.

We have picked out the key themes and concerns and tried to answer them below:

1. CONGESTION CONCERNS

Overall congestion

A common theme from the Southport Eastern Access consultation was concerns how the proposals may result in more congestion.

Congestion during construction

Another theme related to congestion was the impact on journey times as part of the construction phase.

2. SAINBURY’S

The new Sainsbury’s Southport superstore is planned to open February 2024 and will add a new supermarket offering for Southport residents. The consultation responses raised concerns how the new store may add further congestion to the Kew Roundabout area.

3. DISPLACED PARKING

Displaced parking was raised as a concern from the consultation throughout a couple of the junction improvements.

4. ACCESS TO PROPERTIES

Comments were received from properties that proposed plans would amend vehicular access to properties.

5. FLY TIPPING

Fly tipping had been raised as a concern with plans associated with Foul Lane being closed at Castlemore junction.

6. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENTS

  • Comments were received for concern of loss of trees and greenspace.
  • Noise and air pollution were raised in consultation responses.

7. BISPHAM ROAD

  • Comments were received that fully segregated cycle lanes should be proposed instead of lightly segregated cycle lanes which the Council are looking further into.
  • Concerns that the Bus 46 (Russel Road – Carr Lane) will be impacted by the proposed banned left turn from Norwood Road to Tithebarn Road were raised.

8. SUSSEX ROAD / NORWOOD ROAD

Comments were received by residents that the proposals do not go far enough for improving cycling and walking infrastructure along Norwood Road.

9. FOUL LANE CYCLEWAY ENHANCEMENT

Comments were received that the proposals of opening up Foul Lane to vehicles will result in rat-running as motorists try to avoid Norwood Road / Meols Cop Road.

10. KEW ROUNDABOUT

Comments were received regarding making Kew Roundabout a signalised junction to improve the flow of traffic and to hopefully make for safer driving conditions.

11. CASTLEMORE JUNCTION

Comments were received for Foul Lane to remain open at the Castlemore Junction for vehicles, and not just solely for walking and cycling.

12. MEOLS COP

Comments were received from businesses and residents how the proposed plan will directly impact parking.

13. HAMPTON ROAD

Comments were received that the proposed cycle infrastructure and one-way road layout arrangement on Hampton Road will directly impact access to properties.

14. VIRGINIA STREET ROUNDABOUT

Comments were received regarding pedestrian and cycling crossing infrastructure at Virginia Street Roundabout. It was for proposals to go further with having a zebra crossing on all arms of the roundabout and not just the St James Street arm, improving safety and access for all directions.

15. BRIDGE STREET JUNCTION

Comments were received that proposals do not improve walking and cycling infrastructure at similar levels to other junction improvements. For example, active travel infrastructure should be prioritised over on-street parking, to encourage alternative forms of travel.

We did

1. CONGESTION CONCERNS

Overall congestion

Proposals for SEA have been designed to both improve conditions for motorists as well as walking and cycling. Traffic modelling has been undertaken for all key junctions. There is an intention to create a parallel route for traffic along Foul Lane and Wennington Road, which should both ease congestion and improve this route for cyclists.

Congestion during construction

Sefton Council appreciate that during the construction phase period an increase in congestion may be experienced by some road users. Construction is to be carefully phased and organised with other developments / planned works to reduce the delays in travel time.

2. SAINBURY’S

The Council has undergone traffic modelling to confirm roads have enough capacity. The development has its own transport assessments undertaken as part of the planning process

3. DISPLACED PARKING

This will be further considered as part of the design process and fed back accordingly to designers and was mainly in relation to Haig Avenue and phase 3 improvements.

4. ACCESS TO PROPERTIES

Sefton Council are aware of these comments and are contacting property owners to find workable solutions. It should be noted that the Council are prioritising properties which fall within earlier phases to be contacted first. A vehicle tracking exercises will be undertaken to confirm that vehicle access meets all standards.

5. FLY TIPPING

The Council are considering with designers’ ways in which areas can be planned to minimise fly tipping.

6. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENTS

The Council are in discussions with Green Sefton around the whole scheme including trees. In addition, this scheme is one of the first schemes to be going through a carbon assessment process which will include the consideration of trees and the need to mitigate this and replace / replant.

7. BISPHAM ROAD

  • The Council are looking further into where light and fully segregated cycle lanes / infrastructure are appropriate. It should be noted that some areas of development are constrained to the available space / width of the highway.
  • Discussions have been held with Merseytravel regarding the whole scheme and these improvements will not affect the bus routes.

8. SUSSEX ROAD / NORWOOD ROAD

Enhancing cycling connectivity along Norwood Road was investigated by the Council. This route was not deemed appropriate due to carriageway width and the principle nature of the road, in that it’s a main road connecting the north of Southport to Kew Roundabout. A more appropriate parallel route was agreed to be safer, this being Foul Lane Cycleway Enhancement and up Wennington Road.

9. FOUL LANE CYCLEWAY ENHANCEMENT

The Council are aware that reopening Foul Lane up to vehicles will inevitably result in surrounding roads experiencing vehicles, this being the reason mitigation measures are currently being developed for Norwood. Measures will be agreed with Ward Members and the community. The Council have undertaken modelling for these proposals and further modelling will be done as part of developing the final designs and business case. Mitigation measures will be implemented before Foul Lane is opened to vehicles.

10. KEW ROUNDABOUT

Making Kew Roundabout signalised to improve the flow of traffic has been taken onboard and is being investigated by the Council.

11. CASTLEMORE JUNCTION

Castlemore Junction is to be delivered in phase 3, 2027. Sefton Council have taken feedback onboard and are using this to inform further designs.

12. MEOLS COP

The Council are looking into achieving safer streets for school pupils while minimising the impact onto the local community. Sefton Council are keen to accelerate delivering Meols Cop School Active Travel improvements in an earlier phase, but this is subject to funding.

13. HAMPTON ROAD

Different cycle lane and one-way road layout arrangements are being considered for Hampton Road so that access to properties is minimised. The Council are also in communication with both the school and church regarding this.

14. VIRGINIA STREET ROUNDABOUT

One of the main aims of this scheme is to improve conditions for both cycling and walking. The Council welcome comments of how conditions of the proposals can be further improved. Comments relating to more zebra crossings have been fed back to the design team accordingly. It should be noted that the scheme has limited funding available. However further ideas could form part of the mitigation process and / or future schemes in the area.

15. BRIDGE STREET JUNCTION

Bridge Street Junction is to be delivered in phase 3, 2027. Sefton Council have taken feedback onboard and are using this to inform further designs.

We asked

In 2023 we carried out a consultation on a proposal to make changes to the Empty Homes premiums.

You said

  • There is potential for Empty Homes premiums to be used to improve areas suffering from anti-social behaviour due to empty properties attracting crime.
  • Empty Homes should be freed up to tackle issues such as homelessness. The council can gain funds through these proposals to improve services for residents.
  • Some owners had shared concerns about having increased bills at times of unforeseen cicrcumstances determining if a property is empty (such as passing of a relative or tenants unexpectedly vacating).

We did

The Feedback from the consultation was considered by cabinet on 18/01/2024 and the decision was made to approve the changes Empty Homes premiums. The reason for this is because:

  • The changes to Empty Homes premiums are designed to encourage owners to bring properties back in to use and help to ease housing supply pressures.
  • Owners of long-term Empty Properties who have expressed concerns about the difficulties and costs of bringing properties back into use can get advice from the Councils Housing Standards Team
  • Bringing homes back into use can also reduce negative impacts, such as anti-social behaviour, reductions in rental & market values on surrounding properties, desirability of an area.

We asked

In 2023 we carried out a consultation on a proposal to make changes to the Council Tax Reduction Scheme from 1st April 2024.

You said

  • Sometimes people struggle as their income is not enough for the month based on Universal Credit payments, and they have financial difficulties with how they pay their council tax bills.
  • The Council Tax Reduction Scheme needs to be simpler for everyone with less changes to entitlement from month to month based on people’s circumstances. This sometimes causes confusion and stress as multiple letters and bills can be received during this time.

We did

The Feedback from the consultation was considered by cabinet on 18/01/2024 and the decision was made to approve the changes to the Council Tax Reduction Scheme. The reason for this is because

 

  • Changes to the Council Tax Reduction Scheme can make it more straightforward for low-income households to budget household finances for Council Tax payments
  • Reduce confusion for customers and lessen the amount of contact they receive, such as notification letters and Council Tax bills
  • This will also reduce unnecessary work for the Benefits team and contact centre, allowing them to focus on other key areas of customer service
  • It was also identified that these changes wouldn’t impact on vulnerable groups, many of whom rely on help from the Council Tax Reduction scheme.

We asked

Extra Care Allocations Policy

A pledge from the Sefton 2030 vision was to work together to ensure Sefton people have housing choice across all types and tenures across the Borough. One housing option that will support this is Extra Care Housing.

Extra care housing is a specialist housing provision that combines accommodation with care and support services designed to offer safe, private, and secure accommodation.

The draft Extra Care Allocations Policy details the eligibility, process, and system for applying for Extra Care Housing in Sefton.

A public consultation process was conducted from Friday 10th February 2023 for a period of two months to Tuesday 11th April 2023.

We Asked: -

The survey consisted of five questions and comment sections for each and a generic comments section (also including twelve optional equality monitoring questions).

The focus of the consultation and engagement was: -

1)           Extra Care Eligibility

a.           Local Connection

b.           Age Threshold

c.           Support needs

2)           Allocations Process

3)           Nominations Process

You said

Responses received included fifty-two from individuals and two stakeholder groups one of which included ten participants at Parkhaven Extra Care Housing Scheme.

  • 89% agree with the proposed criteria of local connection.
    • Eighteen comments received in relation to the proposed criteria of local connection.
    • Although 89% agreed comments around allowing applicants with close family and carer connections to the borough was highlighted. Agreed to monitor these applications but no change to policy as this could lead to current residents not being able to access extra care housing. This would also leave us open to challenge and would be difficult to manage and apply.

 

  • 92% agree with the proposed age criteria of 55+.
    • Nine comments received in relation to the proposed age criteria of 55+.
    • Some minor mixed comments re upping and lowering the age limit and ensuring careful consideration is given. Overall positive and no changes to the criteria.
  • 87% of response agreed with the proposed criteria to also consider people under the age of 55.
    • Fifteen comments received in relation to the proposed criteria to also consider people under the age of 55.
    • Some positive comments and views.
  • 96% agree with the proposed criteria to also consider people with support needs.
    • Eight comments received in relation to the proposed criteria to also consider people with support needs.
    • 96% in agreeance but some comments and amendment to 3.3 and actions around the care and support specification agreed.
  • Seventeen additional comments received through the generic question around the policy.
    • Some positive comments and overall, no action required.

We did

Our first Extra Care Allocations Policy has now been produced and approved following this feedback.

Amendments included: -

  • Agreed to reviewing the wording of 3.3 of the policy and an action to follow up with Housing Providers re succession rights of tenants.
  • Minor amendment to 3.2 and well put comment re siblings and which will amend 3.3 to reflect.
  • Amendment to 3.3 and actions around the care and support specification agreed.

The policy was shared with cabinet members and was sent to cabinet for approval on the 1st of February 2024.

The policy was also be published on the “Your Sefton, Your Say” platform.

An implementation plan is now underway to ensure the policy is embedded and does what it has set out to do.

We asked

Sefton Economic Strategy Consultation feedback summary.

In total there were 80 comments.

You said

  • To grow is the starting point for success and more support for smaller businesses.
  • Helping businesses to maintain and grow their businesses over a longer period.
  • Lack of affordable office space and land.
  • Businesses at our Economic Forum told us they would like more support on digital inclusion to help them grow and increase their productivity.
  • More opportunities for training and reskilling people.
  • For town centres to be more attractive, green, and accessible for people to live, visit and work.
  • Transport needs to be more flexible and better to meet the needs of the changing population; but we also need to understand more about how people with mobility issues access public transport or amenities as they are unable to walk or cycle due to limited health.
  • Feedback from focus groups included disability access be given more consideration when developing new premises as the needs of disabled people are often overlooked.
  •  
  •  

We did

  • We are working with the Liverpool City Region Combined Authority to use UK Shared Prosperity Funding to support Sefton businesses to start and grow. We aim to do this over the next 2-3 years with new funding coming into Sefton in mid – 2023.
  • We are setting up  a new digital network for businesses called the ‘Sefton Huddle’. Further information will be made available on www.investsefton.com
  • InvestSefton provides a range of support to help businesses of all sizes to grow. This includes one to one support; demand led business workshops and events such as the highly regarded Sefton Economic Forum and referral to many other providers for help with accessing finance, developing new markets, increasing sales and digital skills.
  • The team also works with businesses over the longer term through developing strong relationships to help them grow. Further information is available on www.investsefton.com.
  • Office accommodation is highly competitive in terms of price in south of the borough compared to Liverpool City Centre. Vacant office space exists across Bootle and is available to rent.
  • Sefton Council own Southport Business Park and are in discussions with potential developer, investors and occupiers for this site.
  • Southport Town Deal is helping to fund the Southport Enterprise Arcade - a 880 sqm of refurbished office accommodation for digital and creative business use within Southport Town Centre.  
  • We have launched the Sefton Huddle-A new networking group for the borough’s digital, creative and tech businesses which will meet on a regular basis to help drive ideas to support growth in Sefton’s digital sector.
  • We have worked with a range of local employers to provide Open Days and Jobs Fairs to promote opportunities for a wide range of groups to return to learning and build their skills towards employment. This has included partnerships with organisations such as JobCentre Plus and numerous training providers to offer events for over 50s and also for younger adults, based at the Cambridge Road centre.
  • We have offered a number of accessible drop-in sessions for people looking for flexible employment including a Job Shop at the strand centre promoting work opportunities supporting the forthcoming Eurovision event.
  • We identified a number of employers keen to attract older workers and held the first Over 50s jobs fair, which was attended by more than 70 residents and 10 employers. We intend to make this a regular event.
  • We worked in partnership with a specialist agency who help younger people overcome deal with mental health issues. This resulted in a menu of options for clients from Sefton@work to experience a range of sessions and activities designed to build confidence and link them to the careers guidance. 
  • We are working tirelessly to promote our Caring Business Charter. This enables employers to offer various opportunities such as work experience placements, work trials and visits for people who have experience of care or who are looked after.
  • We are working on a more joined -up offer between Sefton@work and the Sefton Community Learning Service, so residents can track how locally available jobs can be accessible to them through high quality advice and how they can improve their longer-term prospects through building their skills.
  • Bootle town centre has secured capital levelling up funding to improve Bootle Strand as part of the first stage of its repurposing.  This will bring forward improvements to town centre including new open space and enhanced public realm, development of the Salt n Tar events space for a range of public events, community uses and night-time economy as well as enhanced soft landscaping/planting to areas fronting the Bootle canal. This will benefit to the local community and visitors to the area.
  • Investment in Ainsdale on Sea beachfront are proposed subject to environmental considerations to improve the beach toilets and parking facilities.
  • Southport Town Deal programme delivery will include improvements to the Southport visitor economy through the proposed new £73m Marine Lake Events Centre going to Planning Committee in April; enhanced public realm programme Les Transformation de Southport a £2.5m public realm enhancement programme around Southport Market and the refurbishment and improvement of Crown Buildings which will be refurbished into a digital creative business hub - Southport Enterprise Arcade (£1.5M).

The Liverpool City Region combined Authority is developing a new Local Transport Plan.  This local transport plan will look broadly at all transport modes to deliver a high-class transport system fit for the region. 

  • The Councils approved Equalities, Diversity, and Inclusion Strategy (2023-2027) A Borough for Everyone, sets out an ambitious action-oriented strategy which includes a focus on our role as leader of place. Including working with partners, stakeholders, and communities to increase awareness, improve dialogue, and support improved outcomes for all communities in our borough for everyone.
  • The Council have established emerging networking groups to explore issues around how we provide information through the Improving Information Group and around access relating to travel and transport. 
  • The Council have an established staff training programme around Equality Diversity and Inclusion which includes opportunities for awareness training around visual impairment awareness, and around developing Equality Impact Assessments, for schemes, projects, and policies. 
  • The Council undertake Equality Impact Assessments as a key part of project development and are presented as part of formal council reporting. 
  • The Liverpool City Region are participants in the Cycling and Walking Index which explores a range of issues around barriers to walking and cycling.  This research includes a range of protected characteristics including, age, sex and disability amongst others.  The report can be found here; https://www.sustrans.org.uk/the-walking-and-cycling-index/liverpool-city-region-walking-and-cycling-index/.
  • All new build development projects will take disability access into consideration as part of the Council’s policy on equality and diversity and its requirements under its public sector equality duty.  

We asked

During 2021/22 we asked service users and other stakeholders about the substance use treatment service. Our aim is to deliver a modern, integrated, recovery orientated, substance use treatment service for individuals in Sefton who need support to recover from substance use and get their lives back on track.

We wanted to engage with key stakeholders i.e. service staff, pharmacists, partner organisations within the local pathway and service users to get your feedback.

The main themes of all the engagement were around awareness of service, feedback of referral process, quality of service, any gaps in service, any barriers, and stigma.

You said

On the whole respondents were positive about the local service provision and particularly the key workers. Some suggestions you said were:

  • There needs to be more awareness of support on offer from the service and better promotion.
  • There were some barriers and stigma to accessing the service for some people that need support e.g. alcohol users,
  • Community co- location in other venues may help create wider access.
  • Service is very focused on medical/clinical support needs to be wider. Also, there is a need to improve access to mental health support.
  • Lack of group sessions and peer led support in service and wider holistic support model was identified as being needed this links to the demand for a more support for Mental Health after care/ recovery support.
  • Improved service site hubs particularly in Bootle,
  • The need for more outreach work in the community for those who find it difficult to engage,
  • Better communication between service and pharmacies delivering shared care. E.g., contact available out of hours and more formal communication around medications.

We did

This is what we have done/are planning to do:

  • We have planned a stakeholder engagement event and service user day. There will promotion of the service via social media and in local neighbourhoods andl places e.g. pharmacies, GPs, and community venues.
  • The highly valued key worker model will be retained within the new service
  • Improvements on service sites
  • To offer an alternative to the main service sites, there will be satellites in the community in more generic venues to widen access and address stigma.
  • There will be an enhanced outreach service to facilitate engagement with more vulnerable cohorts and those reluctant to engage with the service.
  • A strengthening and a much larger peer led support model and more holistic engagement. A volunteer model to engage residents in service delivery.
  • An extension of psychology and counselling support in house services.
  • Strengthening of links with pharmacies to improve communications including electronic systems and contact out of hours e.g. Saturdays.

We asked

Background

The consultation was undertaken in October-November 2020 to seek the views of both golfers and non-players about the current management of the golf course, and its potential development in the future. This was promoted on site and on-line, with targeted efforts to the resident club, existing players, local schools, colleges and businesses. We received 177 responses.

This consultation was undertaken as part of a wider plan to develop both the course and existing facilities including the development of a driving range on site. The plan was to see the views of golfers, residents, business and visitors and use the information to develop a way forward for the course.

You said

Response

From the questionnaire responses it is fair to say that the respondents enjoy the course, even though they feel the off-course facilities are inadequate. The condition of the course is felt to be acceptable and respondents appreciate that it stays open most of the year compared to other local courses. Despite the poor condition of facilities off the course, golfers do continue to use the course. Golfers would like to see improvements in all elements of the course, from the course itself, practice facilities and the built facilities too, while non-golfers would like improvements to the Whitehouse Café.

There is support for a Driving Range to be developed alongside improving the putting green already on site to upgrade the practice facilities available to users. There is an overwhelming response to improve the off-course facilities with re-opening the Whitehouse Café to provide a bar and clubroom with an associated food offer – somewhere for golfers to get hot food and drink before, during and after a round of golf. Interestingly a few non-golfers responded with the need for a bar as a social place for local residents bringing back a facility that was lost to the area a number of years ago. On the course itself, people would like to see improvements in and around the course including improving the drainage. There was overwhelming support for a possible redesign on the course to improve it.

Overall, the consultation has identified the need for significant investment in both the practice and built facilities at the course and has also identified where smaller investment is needed on the course. Investment is being sought to develop the practice facilities through a prudential loan and there is a long-term ambition to develop the Whitehouse Café to improve the built facilities / food and drink offer through a concession.

We did

What we are doing

Course improvements are on going with improvements to ditches (to aid drainage) and irrigation system planned in the winter of 21/22. Officers are looking at proposals to improve the wider course too with potential external investment in this.

Plans are being drawn up to consider opportunities for the Whitehouse café with a view to getting this back open and available for golfers and non-golfers alike.

These plans are part of an investment strategy for the course that is currently going through Council processes.

We asked

Southport has the opportunity to bid for up to £50m of central Government funding as part of the Town Deal Fund, to boost economic growth and town wide regeneration.  As part of the stakeholder engagement for the submission, a  consultation exercise was undertaken to gather feedback on a number of Big Ideas that would inform a wider Vision for Southport.

Each of these Big Ideas included  a number of project ideas that we thought had  the potential to attract wider investment both from the Government and from the private sector. We asked what you thought of these Big Ideas and what you think we might have missed.

You said

The Town Deal Board received over 2,033 completed questionnaires, with 826 detailed comments from the questionnaires. In addition to this, we received 40 emails, 5 phone calls and 4 letters.

Following the online consultation, the Town Deal Board also engaged with a number of other stakeholder groups including university students, college students school children, visitors and local business owners.

A summary of all the responses received in the full consultation report.

Southport Town Investment Plan Consultation Report

We did

This engagement has informed the Town Investment Plan (TIP) which was submitted to government at the end of October 2020. Key points of influence from engagement include: 

  • The importance of the TIP including projects which enhance the appeal of visitor attractions including Pleasureland and the Southport Theatre and Convention Centre
  • The importance of developing a new attraction in the Marine Lake which will attract more visitors to the town
  • The importance of connecting the town centre and Waterfront
  • Necessity of finding new uses and attractions for vacant shops in the town centre. The importance that different areas and attractions are well connected via the public realm, pedestrian and cycling facilities
  • The need for the TIP to address seasonality in the economy. The TIP should also facilitate the attraction and growth of different industries to the town centre with stakeholders highlighting gaps in the business accommodation offer for co-working space and digital and creative industries
  • The majority of the priorities identified by stakeholders under the Green and Clean theme have non-Towns Fund delivery or funding routes. The consultation does highlight an important role that the Towns Fund can play in ensuring that major regeneration developments in the town centre and waterfront can be reached on foot and by cycling, thereby minimising the need for short vehicular journeys in the town

The priorities expressed by consultees that have not been included in the TIP  will be addressed using funding and delivery routes other than Towns Fund.

The Town Deal Board will continue the conversation with residents, visitors and businesses as the Town Investment Plan progresses.

We asked

Southport has the opportunity to bid for up to £50m of central Government funding as part of the Town Deal Fund, to boost economic growth and town wide regeneration.  As part of the stakeholder engagement for the submission, a  consultation exercise was undertaken to gather feedback on a number of Big Ideas that would inform a wider Vision for Southport.

Each of these Big Ideas included  a number of project ideas that we thought had  the potential to attract wider investment both from the Government and from the private sector. We asked what you thought of these Big Ideas and what you think we might have missed.

You said

The Town Deal Board received over 2,033 completed questionnaires, with 826 detailed comments from the questionnaires. In addition to this, we received 40 emails, 5 phone calls and 4 letters.

Following the online consultation, the Town Deal Board also engaged with a number of other stakeholder groups including university students, college students school children, visitors and local business owners.

A summary of all the responses received in the full consultation report.

Southport Town Investment Plan Consultation Report

We did

This engagement has informed the Town Investment Plan (TIP) which was submitted to government at the end of October 2020. Key points of influence from engagement include: 

  • The importance of the TIP including projects which enhance the appeal of visitor attractions including Pleasureland and the Southport Theatre and Convention Centre
  • The importance of developing a new attraction in the Marine Lake which will attract more visitors to the town
  • The importance of connecting the town centre and Waterfront
  • Necessity of finding new uses and attractions for vacant shops in the town centre. The importance that different areas and attractions are well connected via the public realm, pedestrian and cycling facilities
  • The need for the TIP to address seasonality in the economy. The TIP should also facilitate the attraction and growth of different industries to the town centre with stakeholders highlighting gaps in the business accommodation offer for co-working space and digital and creative industries
  • The majority of the priorities identified by stakeholders under the Green and Clean theme have non-Towns Fund delivery or funding routes. The consultation does highlight an important role that the Towns Fund can play in ensuring that major regeneration developments in the town centre and waterfront can be reached on foot and by cycling, thereby minimising the need for short vehicular journeys in the town

The priorities expressed by consultees that have not been included in the TIP  will be addressed using funding and delivery routes other than Towns Fund.

The Town Deal Board will continue the conversation with residents, visitors and businesses as the Town Investment Plan progresses.

We asked

Southport has the opportunity to bid for up to £50m of central Government funding as part of the Town Deal Fund, to boost economic growth and town wide regeneration.  As part of the stakeholder engagement for the submission, a  consultation exercise was undertaken to gather feedback on a number of Big Ideas that would inform a wider Vision for Southport.

Each of these Big Ideas included  a number of project ideas that we thought had  the potential to attract wider investment both from the Government and from the private sector. We asked what you thought of these Big Ideas and what you think we might have missed.

You said

The Town Deal Board received over 2,033 completed questionnaires, with 826 detailed comments from the questionnaires. In addition to this, we received 40 emails, 5 phone calls and 4 letters.

Following the online consultation, the Town Deal Board also engaged with a number of other stakeholder groups including university students, college students school children, visitors and local business owners.

A summary of all the responses received in the full consultation report.

Southport Town Investment Plan Consultation Report

We did

This engagement has informed the Town Investment Plan (TIP) which was submitted to government at the end of October 2020. Key points of influence from engagement include: 

  • The importance of the TIP including projects which enhance the appeal of visitor attractions including Pleasureland and the Southport Theatre and Convention Centre
  • The importance of developing a new attraction in the Marine Lake which will attract more visitors to the town
  • The importance of connecting the town centre and Waterfront
  • Necessity of finding new uses and attractions for vacant shops in the town centre. The importance that different areas and attractions are well connected via the public realm, pedestrian and cycling facilities
  • The need for the TIP to address seasonality in the economy. The TIP should also facilitate the attraction and growth of different industries to the town centre with stakeholders highlighting gaps in the business accommodation offer for co-working space and digital and creative industries
  • The majority of the priorities identified by stakeholders under the Green and Clean theme have non-Towns Fund delivery or funding routes. The consultation does highlight an important role that the Towns Fund can play in ensuring that major regeneration developments in the town centre and waterfront can be reached on foot and by cycling, thereby minimising the need for short vehicular journeys in the town

The priorities expressed by consultees that have not been included in the TIP  will be addressed using funding and delivery routes other than Towns Fund.

The Town Deal Board will continue the conversation with residents, visitors and businesses as the Town Investment Plan progresses.

We asked

Southport has the opportunity to bid for up to £50m of central Government funding as part of the Town Deal Fund, to boost economic growth and town wide regeneration.  As part of the stakeholder engagement for the submission, a  consultation exercise was undertaken to gather feedback on a number of Big Ideas that would inform a wider Vision for Southport.

Each of these Big Ideas included  a number of project ideas that we thought had  the potential to attract wider investment both from the Government and from the private sector. We asked what you thought of these Big Ideas and what you think we might have missed.

You said

The Town Deal Board received over 2,033 completed questionnaires, with 826 detailed comments from the questionnaires. In addition to this, we received 40 emails, 5 phone calls and 4 letters.

Following the online consultation, the Town Deal Board also engaged with a number of other stakeholder groups including university students, college students school children, visitors and local business owners.

A summary of all the responses received can be found in this report.Southport Town Investment Plan Consultation Report

We did

This engagement has informed the Town Investment Plan (TIP) which was submitted to government at the end of October 2020. Key points of influence from engagement include: 

  • The importance of the TIP including projects which enhance the appeal of visitor attractions including Pleasureland and the Southport Theatre and Convention Centre
  • The importance of developing a new attraction in the Marine Lake which will attract more visitors to the town
  • The importance of connecting the town centre and Waterfront
  • Necessity of finding new uses and attractions for vacant shops in the town centre. The importance that different areas and attractions are well connected via the public realm, pedestrian and cycling facilities
  • The need for the TIP to address seasonality in the economy. The TIP should also facilitate the attraction and growth of different industries to the town centre with stakeholders highlighting gaps in the business accommodation offer for co-working space and digital and creative industries
  • The majority of the priorities identified by stakeholders under the Green and Clean theme have non-Towns Fund delivery or funding routes. The consultation does highlight an important role that the Towns Fund can play in ensuring that major regeneration developments in the town centre and waterfront can be reached on foot and by cycling, thereby minimising the need for short vehicular journeys in the town

The priorities expressed by consultees that have not been included in the TIP  will be addressed using funding and delivery routes other than Towns Fund.

 

The Town Deal Board will continue the conversation with residents, visitors and businesses as the Town Investment Plan progresses.

We asked

Southport has the opportunity to bid for up to £50m of central Government funding as part of the Town Deal Fund, to boost economic growth and town wide regeneration.  As part of the stakeholder engagement for the submission, a  consultation exercise was undertaken to gather feedback on a number of Big Ideas that would inform a wider Vision for Southport.

Each of these Big Ideas included  a number of project ideas that we thought had  the potential to attract wider investment both from the Government and from the private sector. We asked what you thought of these Big Ideas and what you think we might have missed.

You said

The Town Deal Board received over 2,033 completed questionnaires, with 826 detailed comments from the questionnaires. In addition to this, we received 40 emails, 5 phone calls and 4 letters.

Following the online consultation, the Town Deal Board also engaged with a number of other stakeholder groups including university students, college students school children, visitors and local business owners.

A summary of all the responses received can be found in this report.Southport Town Investment Plan Consultation Report

We did

This engagement has informed the Town Investment Plan (TIP) which was submitted to government at the end of October 2020. Key points of influence from engagement include: 

  • The importance of the TIP including projects which enhance the appeal of visitor attractions including Pleasureland and the Southport Theatre and Convention Centre
  • The importance of developing a new attraction in the Marine Lake which will attract more visitors to the town
  • The importance of connecting the town centre and Waterfront
  • Necessity of finding new uses and attractions for vacant shops in the town centre. The importance that different areas and attractions are well connected via the public realm, pedestrian and cycling facilities
  • The need for the TIP to address seasonality in the economy. The TIP should also facilitate the attraction and growth of different industries to the town centre with stakeholders highlighting gaps in the business accommodation offer for co-working space and digital and creative industries
  • The majority of the priorities identified by stakeholders under the Green and Clean theme have non-Towns Fund delivery or funding routes. The consultation does highlight an important role that the Towns Fund can play in ensuring that major regeneration developments in the town centre and waterfront can be reached on foot and by cycling, thereby minimising the need for short vehicular journeys in the town

The priorities expressed by consultees that have not been included in the TIP  will be addressed using funding and delivery routes other than Towns Fund.

The Town Deal Board will continue the conversation with residents, visitors and businesses as the Town Investment Plan progresses.

We asked

Between November and December 2019, parents and carers of children/young people with SEND had the opportunity to take part in a survey on what is going well and what could be improved in Sefton around the key areas of education, health, social care, information provision and how the Sefton SEND Area Partnership is working together.
The survey would help provide the SEND Continuous Improvements Board with a baseline to monitor experience, involvement and satisfaction.
 

 

You said

  • You wanted the 20 week timescale for EHCP completion to be improved
  • You wanted the quality of the EHCPs to improve
  • You wanted to be able to contact your Case Work Officers directly
  • You wanted to be more involved in contributing to the outcomes within the EHCP
  • You wanted a clearer ASD pathway
  • We like Aiming High but there are some areas that can be improved

We did

  • We are now completing more EHCPs within the timescales – currently at 77% of plans being completed within the 20 weeks
  • We have delivered outcomes training to front line staff who complete EHCPs etc and introduced a monthly Quality Assurance process
  • Case Work Officers now share mobile phone numbers when they first contact you
  • We now invite parents/carers to be involved in joint outcomes meetings
  • Since April 2020 we have put in place a new pathway that is compliant with the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)
  • We are reviewing the Aiming High service so there is an age appropriate offer

 

Thank you to all the parents and carers who took the time to complete the survey. The full report is available to view on the Local Offer:
bit.ly/SEND-survey-full-report-2019